Beef heart mix for growing fish

The discus have been growing well, and I feel that it is time to move them onto a more fish-based diet, so I have come up with a variation on one of the earlier recipes, with this beef heart mix for growing fish. As before, this beef heart mix is aimed at young fish, I used decapsulated brine shrimp, Spirulina, fish and spinach.

Information

  • Type: fish food
  • Preparation time: 20 minutes
  • Total time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 500g

Ingredients

  • 75 g spinach
  • 12 g decapsulated brine shrimp
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 125 g beef heart (fat, arteries, veins and lining removed)
  • 125 g fresh or frozen fish
  • 25 g Spirulina
  • gelatin (enough to make up 500 ml)
  • water

Instructions

  1. Soak the spinach in boiling water until it becomes soft
  2. Rehydrate the decapsulated brine shrimp, 25 g of shrimp needed 30-40 ml of water for rehydration
  3. Cut up the beef heart, fish and spinach into small pieces
  4. Mince the garlic (I use a garlic press for this)
  5. Place spinach, brine shrimp, garlic, beef heart and Spirulina into a blender, mixing until it forms a smooth paste (some people prefer to use a mincer)
  6. Make up the gelatin with 100 ml of water and add into the blender
  7. Mix the gelatin into the paste
  8. Place mixture into containers to chill before freezing (I use 9-10 10×15 cm grip-lock bags, placing approximately two large tablespoons into each bag)
  • Author: Ekaterina Gerasimova
  • Published: 24th May 2012

Beef heart mix for community fish

I was asked today about what to do with Spirulina, so below is a generic beef heart mix that can be made up with Spirulina and that should be suitable for most community fish. Beef heart should be fed to most community fish only as a treat, not as a staple, as it does not provide a balanced diet, but using a high proportion of generic fish food and spinach should help balance it out. 100g of beef heart is approximately 1/8 of a heart before it is prepared for fish food.

Information

  • Type: fish food
  • Preparation time: 15 minutes
  • Total time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 600g

Ingredients

  • 100 g spinach
  • 100 g generic dry fish food (like flakes or pellets)
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 100 g beef heart (fat, arteries, veins and lining removed)
  • 20-30 g Spirulina
  • gelatin (enough to make up 500 ml)
  • water

Instructions

  1. Soak the spinach in boiling water until it becomes soft
  2. Crush or pulverise the fish food until it is in small pieces or powder
  3. Cut up the beef heart and spinach into small pieces
  4. Mince the garlic (I use a garlic press for this)
  5. Place spinach, dry fish food, garlic, beef heart and Spirulina into a blender, mixing until it forms a smooth paste (some people prefer to use a mincer)
  6. Make up the gelatin with 250 ml of water and add into the blender
  7. Mix the gelatin into the paste
  8. Place mixture into containers to chill before freezing (I used 10 10×15 cm grip-lock bags, placing approximately two large tablespoons into each bag)
  • Author: Ekaterina Gerasimova
  • Published: 12th March 2012

Making beef heart mix

Since I am hoping to receive discus soon, I decided to make a small batch of beef heart mix for them. I do not have any set recipes to use, just make up whatever I have at home. Since this mix is aimed at young fish, I used decapsulated brine shrimp, Spirulina, spinach and garlic. Some people even add extra vitamins to fish food, although I did not because I feed a range of other foods which should provide a well balanced diet between them.

Information

  • Type: fish food
  • Preparation time: 15 minutes
  • Total time: 1 hour
  • Yield: 500g

Ingredients

  • 50 g spinach
  • 20 g decapsulated brine shrimp
  • 1 clove garlic
  • 250 g beef heart (fat, arteries, veins and lining removed)
  • 30 g Spirulina
  • gelatin (enough to make up 500 ml)
  • water

Instructions

  1. Soak the spinach in boiling water until it becomes soft
  2. Rehydrate the decapsulated brine shrimp
  3. Cut up the beef heart and spinach into small pieces
  4. Mince the garlic (I use a garlic press for this)
  5. Place spinach, brine shrimp, garlic, beef heart and Spirulina into a blender, mixing until it forms a smooth paste (some people prefer to use a mincer)
  6. Make up the gelatin with 250 ml of water and add into the blender
  7. Mix the gelatin into the paste
  8. Place mixture into containers to chill before freezing (I used 10 10×15 cm grip-lock bags, placing approximately two large tablespoons into each bag)
  • Author: Ekaterina Gerasimova
  • Published: 14th February 2012

Danios settling in

Danios are in

It has been almost a week since the Danios were added, they have settled in well and are relatively bold, but do not seem to appreciate when someone walks quickly across the room (as is expected). They certainly seem to enjoy the piece of wood, spending much of their time swimming through the holes in the base and around the stems, but do come right to the front of the glass when they notice me looking at them. The females are receiving plenty of attention from the males and one is looking considerably more plump now, so they may spawn soon.

The fish found the flow of the filter to be disturbing, so I have attempted to slow it down by wrapping filter wool around the rough sponge and placing more still between the sponge and the bio media. It seems to have helped slightly, but not enough, so I am still thinking about how to slow it down further. The stand building project has come to a bit of a stand still as I am quite lazy, but this has given me an incentive to get it going again because the external filter has a 300 lph rating compared to the 700 lph that came with the aquarium.

The fish are feeding well on frozen Daphnia and Artemia, with a supplement of high-protein granules and generic flakes. The 10 fish eat only tiny amounts, so even the smallest tub of fish food will last for years at this rate. Given that most fish food goes off in a matter of 1-6 months, it makes sense to separate it into smaller containers, freezing or chilling the majority of it until it is needed.

There have not really been any major signs of algae, I am still cleaning off mild signs of diatoms from the glass every couple of weeks, but that is it. Most of the plants are doing well, and I plan to split up one or two of the Cryptocoryne parva bunches into individual plants over the next week.